Ultiworld

The Ultimate Frisbee Glossary

As is the case with almost any hobby or community, ultimate is loaded with jargon and slang that can make it sound like it has a language all its own. If you’re new to the sport and don’t know a “brick” from a “flick,” this glossary is for you.

Notice some jargon or alternate definition that is missing from our list? Submit the term and a definition to editor@ultiworld.com and it may be added to our glossary.

Looking to learn more about the basics of our sport? Check out more in our Ultimate Fundamentals series. Want to see how to use this vocabulary is used on or site? Check out Ultiworld’s Style Guide.

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

A

Ace: An offensive player at the front of a vertical stack in charge of catching thrower-initiated passes to the break side, or making continuation cuts after a reset throw.

Synonymous terms: “X,” “Alpha”

Air-bounce: A throwing technique that causes the disc to bounce on the air and rise during its flight, completed by imparting downward pressure on the top side of the disc at the point of release. Normally done with a backhand grip. It can create more of a floating disc flight.

Alpha: An offensive player that is tasked with trying to get open in isolation, often in an endzone setting.

Synonymous terms: “Iso,” “X”

Anhyzer: The shape of a throw that begins its flight with the top of the disc facing toward the thrower but is angled to flatten out or turn later in its flight. Compare to “Hyzer.” Term more commonly used in disc golf than ultimate.

Synonymous terms: “Outside-In”

Around: A throw — often, but not necessarily a break throw — that goes to the side of the marker that is opposite to the force side.

Assist: A pass that is caught for a goal. One of the fundamental offensive stats in ultimate.

B

Backfield: The area of the field behind the thrower relative to the direction of offensive movement. Compare “Downfield.” “Upfield” is sometimes used to refer to both of these contradictory areas, but is discouraged by Ultiworld.

Backhand: A fundamental throw in ultimate that is released with the back of the hand facing the target.

Backing: Downfield defender positioning behind the offensive player relative to the thrower, prioritizing denying a deep cut away from the disc.

Backpack: An unsafe bid, whether offensively or defensively, where one player ends up badly colliding with or landing on another player’s back.

Bagel: To defeat a team without allowing them to score any points; a shutout.

Bait: A technique used by defenders that deceptively makes a throwing window appear open to encourage a pass, only for the defender to then disrupt the throw once it is in the air.

Banana cut: Motion from an offensive player without the disc that is characterized by a rounded path rather than a sharp change in direction while attempting to get open to receive a pass.

Barbecue backhand: A throw that is released with the back of the hand facing the target where the entire throwing motion takes place on the same side of the body as the hand throwing the disc as opposed to winding up across the body.

Synonymous terms: “Dad backhand”

Bid: 1. A diving attempt to catch or block a disc.

Synonymous terms: “Layout”

2. An invitation to participate in a tournament. These can either be awarded by the event host or earned through qualification to the next round of a playoff structure, such as a USAU College or Club Series.

3. An application submitted to seek an invitation to an event.

Blade: A pass, usually a forehand, that is thrown with the disc released at a steep, even vertical, angle and remaining on that flight path.

Block: To intercept or knock the disc out of the air on defense that creates a turnover. The most basic defensive stat tracked in ultimate.

Synonymous terms: “D”

Bookends: A goal scored by a player whose defensive play or block earned the team the scoring possession.

Synonymous terms: “Double happiness”

Box-and-one: A type of junk defense where one player plays 1-on-1 defense against a single offensive player — typically the most threatening player — while other defenders play zone.

Bracket: 1. A defensive technique in which two or more defenders in a matchup defense scheme cover two or more distinct spaces on the field (usually deep and under). By communicating and switching, the players can “bracket” the cutters, effectively playing a miniature zone to prevent the offensive players from getting open.

Synonymous terms: “Sandwich”

2. A common format in tournament play for determining a champion.

Break: 1. A score by the team that started the point on defense. Conceptually similar to a break in tennis.

2. A throw to the part of the field that the marker was attempting to protect.

Break side: The area of the field restricted by the mark. A throw to this area is called a break throw.

Brick: A pull that lands out of bounds.

Brick mark: A location on the playing field, centered between the sidelines and a set distance from the goal line, where out-of-bounds pulls can be initiated by the offense.

C

Call lines: 1. Any formal way a team designates which seven players will be on the field for any given point.

2. Any formal way the pulling team sets defensive assignments in a matchup scheme.

Callahan (goal): A score that happens when a defender intercepts a pass in their attacking endzone. The only unassisted score in ultimate. Named after Henry Callahan.

Callahan (award):A yearly award administered by USA Ultimate for a D-I college player in each gender division recognizing on-field playing excellence as well as “outstanding sportsmanship, leadership, and dedication to ultimate.” Nominees are chosen by teams (often promoted with a highlight video) and voted on by current college players. Named after Henry Callahan.

Chase: A position in a zone defense charged with following the disc and setting a mark on each successive thrower.

Synonymous terms: “Rabbit,” “Puppy”

Chisel: A cut that attacks a cup zone by coming from behind the thrower with forward momentum into the cup.

Clam: A hybrid defensive scheme typically played against vertical stack, in which defenders matchup on the handlers but play a zone/switching defense on the players in the stack, often for a set number of throws at the start of a possession.

Clear: Motion from an offensive player that leaves an area of the field in order to make space for teammates to enter a possible throwing lane. Often occurs after a cut that was not thrown to.

Clog: When an offensive player fails to clear from a throwing lane, preventing downfield offensive moment that allows other players to get open.

Contest: A disagreement between opponents over a foul or violation call. A contested call generally causes the play to reset.

Crash: An offensive cut between the first layer of zone defenders, typically members of a cup, to be a throwing option.

Cross step: A footwork approach typically used for pulling or disc golf driving where the trailing foot (left foot for a right-handed thrower) crosses behind the lead/plant foot on the approach to the pull, allowing the thrower a larger rotational range of motion and improving power generation.

Synonymous terms: “X step”

Crosswind: Wind blowing from sideline to sideline horizontally across the field. Compare “downwind”/”upwind”

Cup: A multi-person marking scheme that typically tries to prevent yardage-gaining throws as a part of a zone defense.

Cut: Motion from an offensive player without the disc, typically including a juke or change in direction, while attempting to get open to receive a pass.

Cutter: An offensive player that typically tries to get open on motion downfield, gaining yards for the offense.

D

D: To intercept or knock the disc out of the air on defense that creates a turnover. The most basic defensive stat tracked in ultimate.

Synonymous terms: “Block”

D-line: The defensive line, typically referring to the group of players on a team that predominantly play defensive points. May refer to a specific seven players taking the field for a specific defensive point, or an entire unit of players on a team’s roster.

Dad backhand: A throw that is released with the back of the hand facing the target where the entire throwing motion takes place on the same side of the body as the hand throwing the disc as opposed to winding up across the body.

Synonymous terms: “Barbecue backhand”

Dead disc: A state when the disc is not actively in play, for example during a stoppage for a foul discussion. A dead disc requires acknowledgment from both teams to be brought back into a state of active play.

Deep deep: The player that covers the area furthest downfield from the thrower in a zone or switching defensive scheme.

Synonymous terms: “Last back,” “Deep”

Dish: A short pass. Most often, this is a reset throw or one to a player that is moving downfield with forward momentum, usually with their eyes on the downfield cutters.

Synonymous terms: “Dishy”

Doink: A dropped pass that is normally a high-percentage catch.

Dominator: An offensive set where a small group of players — usually three — are given additional space and attack utilizing each other’s movements and throws while the rest of the offensive players stay out of the way.

Donovan: A yearly award administered by Ultiworld and USA Ultimate for a D-III college player in each gender division celebrated for outstanding on-field playing ability, adherence to Spirit of the Game, and leadership in the community. Nominees are chosen by teams (often promoted with a highlight video) and voted on by current D-III college players. Similar to the Callahan Award, but for Division III college divisions. Named after Kelly Donovan.

Double game point: The final point of a tied game in which the next point determines the winner.

Synonymous terms: “Universe point,” “DGP”

Double happiness: When a single player generates a block or turnover while on defense and then scores the goal to end the same point.

Synonymous terms: “Bookends”

Double team: When more than one defensive player is guarding the same offensive player. In WFDF and USA Ultimate rulesets, it is illegal to double team the offensive player with the disc, though it is legal in the AUDL.

Downfield: The area of the field in front of the thrower relative to the direction of offensive movement. Compare “Backfield.” “Upfield” is sometimes used to refer to both of these contradictory areas, but is discouraged by Ultiworld.

Downwind: Wind blowing from endzone to endzone with the direction of offensive moment.

Dribbling: Advancing the disc through a series of short passes between offensive players, particularly when one player is receiving every other pass.

Dump: 1. A pass that is thrown into the backfield, often to reset the stall count.

2. An offensive player positioned to receive such a pass.

Synonymous terms: “Reset”

Dump-swing: A common offensive motion that moves the disc to the backfield with the intention of immediately sending it across the field horizontally.

E

End zone: The designated scoring areas on the field, located between the goal line and back line, bounded by the sidelines.

F

Fire: A common verbal cue word used to instruct a defense to transition from one defensive scheme to another, typically from zone to match-up.

Flash: A defensive motion whereby a defender quickly jumps into a throwing lane to either make a play on the disc or merely discourage a throw, before then returning to guard their matchup.

Flexagon: A hybrid defensive style somewhere between matchup and zone defense, characterized by switching, surrounding, and repositioning defensive players based on offensive positioning and movement.

Flick: A fundamental throw in ultimate that is released with the palm of the hand facing the target or towards the sky. Similar to a tennis forehand or a sidearm pitch in baseball.

Synonymous terms: “Forehand,” “Sidearm”

Flip: Like a coin toss, a way to determine who will start on offense or defense by correctly calling which side of a disc will land up after being flipped end-over-end in the air.

Flood: An offensive motion where offensive players downfield move collectively from one side of the field to another as a way to create space, change throwing lanes and angles, isolate a single cutter, or counter a defense that might be bracketing or otherwise poaching.

Flow: How well an offense can execute. Most often, being in a state of flow means the offense is executing cleanly and easily.

Foot block: When a defender deflects or stops a thrown disc while on the mark with their foot or any part of their lower leg.

Force: A defensive marking strategy designed to limit the throwing lanes available to the person with the disc and pressure the offense to work toward a designated area(s) of the field. The marker tries to make it difficult for the thrower by placing their body in the way of throws to one part of the field while the downfield defenders attempt to prevent cuts to the open portions.

Typically, the defense is articulated as “Force [a direction],” indicating where the marker is attempting to encourage the thrower toward.

Common forcing strategies include:

  • Force away – Using a mark to push the thrower toward the sideline opposite where your team’s bench/stuff is located; traditionally paired with “force home.”
  • Force backhand – Using a mark to push the thrower toward the sideline on the left of the thrower when they are facing upfield (where a right-handed backhand would be thrown from); traditionally paired with “force forehand.”
  • Force flat – Standing directly between the thrower and the end zone, using a mark to push throws to go toward either sideline but not up the middle of the field; equivalent to “force straight-up.”
  • Force forehand – Using a mark to push the thrower toward the sideline on the right of the thrower when they are facing upfield (where a right-handed forehand would be thrown from); traditionally paired with “force backhand.”
  • Force home – Using a mark to push the thrower toward the sideline where your team’s bench/stuff is located; traditionally paired with “force away.”
  • Force left – Similar to Force home or away, using a mark to push a thrower toward a specific direction or sideline. Commonly used in Germany and traditionally paired with “force right.”
  • Force middle – Using a mark to push the thrower toward the center of the field and not allowing a throw toward the sideline closest to them; this often results in the force switching directions throughout the possession.
  • Force right – Similar to Force home or away, using a mark to push a thrower toward a specific direction or sideline. Commonly used in Germany and traditionally paired with “force left.”
  • Force sideline – Using a mark to push the thrower toward whichever sideline is closest and not allowing a throw toward the middle of the field; this often results in the force switching directions throughout the possession.
  • Force straight-up – Standing directly between the thrower and the end zone, using a mark to push throws to go toward either sideline but not up the middle of the field; equivalent to “force flat.”

Forehand: A fundamental throw in ultimate that is released with the palm of the hand facing the target or towards the sky. Similar to a tennis forehand or a sidearm pitch in baseball.

Synonymous terms: “Flick,” “Sidearm”

Foul: Non-incidental contact between opposing players, ie contact that affects the outcome of the play. In general, the player initiating the contact has committed the foul. Often results in a stoppage of play to adjudicate the infraction.

Fronting: As a downfield defender, positioning yourself closer vertically to the thrower than the offensive player you are guarding, prioritizing denying an in cut towards the disc.

G

Game Advisor: A neutral, third-party, on-field official at some World Flying Disc Federation (WFDF) events that can provide rules clarifications to players and offer an impartial opinion without making a binding decision in the case of a disputed call, aiming to help players self-officiate efficiently and allowing final decision-making to remain with the players.

Give-and-go: An offensive technique where immediately after throwing, a player begins making their next cut, usually in an attempt to receive the next pass.

Gratuitous: A somewhat pejorative slang term for an unnecessary in-game action, usually a flashy one, such as a layout for a throw that could have been caught in a simpler fashion.

Greatest: A play in which a receiver jumps from in bounds, catches the disc while going out of bounds, throws it back into the field of play while in the air before landing out of bounds, and completes the pass to a teammate.

H

Hammer: An overhead throw with a forehand grip that is released close to vertical that turns over as it travels and reaches its target upside down. If not a foundational skill, much closer to a fundamental than a trick throw.

Hand block: When a defender uses their hands or arms to deflect or stuff a thrown disc while on the mark.

Handler: A core position in ultimate, referring to a player that typically touches the disc a lot and serves as a thrower, akin to a quarterback in football. Usually, handlers operate around the disc or in the backfield.

Hard cap: The ending of a game once a predetermined time of play has elapsed. While ultimate is often played primarily to a point total, there are typically predetermined time limitations on the length of a game. At the hard cap — the predetermined end time — the current point is completed and the team with the higher score wins. In the case of a tie, one final point is played.

Helix: When a throw that is released upside down (such as a hammer or scoober) rotates all the way around during flight such that it approaches vertical and begins to fade back the other direction.

Hexagon: An offensive formation and strategy typified by players setting up in and maintaining a hexagon shape, continuous motion, and high-paced disc movement.

High-release: Referring to the height a pass is released from compared to the body; can be applied to any throw that is released above shoulder-level where the top of the disc is still facing up (ie, not an upside-down throw like a hammer or scoober).

High side: On a field with a distinct crosswind, the half of the field that is further upwind. Compare “Low side.”

Hold line: Used as a request for a team preparing to receive the pull to remain in order on the goal line, not crossing in front of or behind one another in a way that obscures them from view as the pulling team assigns defensive match-ups.

Ho/Horizontal stack: An offensive formation in which cutters line up downfield in a horizontal line stretching from sideline to sideline, to initiate movement. Compare “Vertical stack.”

Hospital pass: A high, floaty throw that stays airborne for a long time, allowing for a cluster of jostling players under its eventual landing spot.

Huck: A long-distance throw, typically over 30 yards.

Huck and Play D: A play in which the offense intentionally throws a long, unlikely-to-be-completed pass toward their attacking end zone and immediately transitions to defense to try to force a turnover and earn back possession in a more favorable field position. Most often seen on a point when a team is scoring downwind.

Hyzer: The shape of a throw that begins its flight with the top of the disc facing away from the thrower but is angled to flatten out or turn later in its flight. Compare to “Anhyzer.” Term more commonly used in disc golf than ultimate.

Synonymous terms: “Inside-Out”

 

I

Inside: 1. The breakside space or throwing lane that is on the side of the marker that is closer to the force side.

2. A throw into this space.

Inside-Out (IO): The shape of a throw that begins its flight with the top of the disc facing away from the thrower but is angled to flatten out or turn later in its flight. Compare to “Outside-In.”

Synonymous terms: “Hyzer” (from disc golf)

Iso/Isolation: 1. An offensive maneuver to clear an area on the field for a designated player to get open without teammates occupying or crossing the same space.

2. The designated receiver in this maneuver.

J

Junk: Any defense that mixes elements of matchup and zone defenses, but wouldn’t be categorized as either. Often evolving over the course of a possession, junk defenses are designed to disrupt expected throwing lanes and confuse an offense. For example, a defense that sets individual matchups on the opposition’s handlers but plays a zone downfield, or one that has defenders guarding spaces for the first few passes of a possession before reverting to a strict matchup scheme.

K
L

Lane: An area of the field where a thrower might deliver a pass; often used to discuss effective downfield offensive spacing and movement (see clearing, clogging).

Layout: A diving attempt to catch or block a disc.

Synonymous terms: “Bid”

Long: A long-distance throw, typically over 30 yards. Common vocabulary in parts of Europe.

Synonymous terms: “Huck”

Look off: When a thrower decides not to attempt a pass to an active cutter/receiver, often communicated with a pump-fake in order to move onto another option.

Low-release: Referring to the height a pass is released from compared to the body; can be applied to any throw that is released below knee-level.

Low side: On a field with a distinct crosswind, the half of the field that is further downwind. Compare “High side.”

M

Man Defense: A defensive scheme where each defender is responsible for covering a single offensive player. Because of its gendered language and easy replacements, this terminology is banned in the Ultiworld Style Guide.

Synonymous terms: “Matchup defense,” “Person defense”

Mark: 1. A defensive maneuver attempting to prevent a thrower from delivering the disc to a designated area of the field by putting your body in the way. See, “Force.”

2. Informal synonym for “marker,” ie the defender applying a mark to the offensive player currently in possession of the disc.

3. Less commonly, any offensive player that is your defensive responsibility in a matchup scheme.

Marker: The defensive player applying a mark to the offensive player currently in possession of the disc.

Synonymous terms: “Mark”

Matchup defense: A defensive scheme where each defender is responsible for covering a single offensive player.

Synonymous terms: “Person defense”

Middle: An offensive player that tries to get open on cuts downfield — most frequently under cuts as opposed to deep cuts — gaining yards for the offense. Common term in France.

Synonymous terms: “Cutter”

Middle Middle: A position guarding the center of the field in some zone defensive schemes.

Synonymous terms: “Short deep”

N

No huck: A verbal defensive call to a marker to communicate that they should try to stop the thrower from attempting a long pass, usually a quick flash to a straight-up marking position to disrupt an easy throw to an open target deep.

O

O-line: The offensive line, typically referring to the group of players on a team that predominantly play offensive points. May refer to a specific seven players taking the field for a specific offensive point, or an entire unit of players on a team’s roster.

OB: Abbreviation for Out of Bounds.

Observer: A neutral, third-party, on-field official that helps resolve self-officiation disputes between players, keeps time, and enforces player conduct. At some USAU events, observers are empowered to make active calls related to objective elements of gameplay (for example: in or out of bounds calls, whether an attempted catch is up or down) as well as make binding rulings in the case of disputed foul or violation calls.

Outside-In (OI): The shape of a throw that begins its flight with the top of the disc facing toward the thrower but is angled to flatten out or turn later in its flight. Compare to “Inside-out.”

Synonymous terms: “Anhyzer”

OIO (or OIIO): A throw that is released with an outside-in (OI) angle, but to the marking area that is typically attacked with inside-out (IO) throws. In other words, an OI throw to the IO lane — combined to form OIIO.

P

Pancake: A catching technique where the disc is clapped between two hands, one on top on the face and the other on under side of the disc.

Synonymous terms: “Clap catch,” “Alligator catch”

Person defense: A defensive scheme where each defender is responsible for covering a single offensive player.

Synonymous terms: “Matchup defense”

Pick: An infraction that occurs whenever an offensive player moves in a manner that causes a defensive player guarding an offensive player to be obstructed by another player. Obstruction may result from contact with, or the need to avoid, the obstructing player.

Pickup: An informal game of ultimate where there are no teams set in advance and anyone is welcome to join.

Pivot: The single point of contact with the ground that a thrower must maintain while in possession of the disc.

Poach: A defensive maneuver whereby a defender guards a throwing lane or other space as opposed to guarding a single opponent. This maneuver can be done either temporarily within a matchup scheme or in a sustained way as part of a junk defense.

Point block: When a defender deflects or stops a thrown disc while on the mark.

Popper: A player in a zone offense making active cuts in and around the cup or front wall.

Power position: When an offensive player receives the disc with their momentum carrying them toward their attacking end zone, such that the next pass would benefit from the additional momentum gained by their motion.

Pull: The throw from one team starting in their own end zone to their opponents on the other side of the field that initiates each point of an ultimate game. Akin to a kickoff in football.

Pull play: A pre-planned series of cuts and throws to begin an offensive point, designed to create optimal offensive attacking situations.

Punt: A throw that attempts to give the throwing team favorable field position on the ensuing defensive possession, prioritizing that aspect over the likelihood of completion. See also “Huck and Play D.”

Push Pass: A throw held similarly to a backhand with the index finger along the edge of the disc, released with the palm facing forward and flicking the wrist toward the target to impart rotational spin. Most effective as a short-distance pass in low wind.

Q
R

Rabbit: A position in a zone defense charged with following the disc and setting a mark on each successive thrower.

Synonymous terms: “Chase,” “Puppy”

Read: 1. Anticipating where a disc will end up based on its flight shape and characteristics.

2. Anticipating the movement of players or the disc between players.

Reset: A (typically) short pass between handlers that has a primary objective to extend a possession by starting a new stall count or changing the angle of attack, rather than attempting to gain yards downfield toward the attacking end zone.

Synonymous terms: “Dump”

Roll: A defensive tactic where a marker drops off the thrower or soon-to-be-thrower to pick up a cutting player, while that player’s defender moves to mark the thrower.

Roller: A pull that is thrown at a vertical angle in an attempt to have it land and run along the ground on its side to extend its distance or direct it toward a sideline.

S

Same third: A way to describe a pass that moves the disc entirely within the confines of a single part of the field if it were divided vertically into equal thirds. It is often seen as more dangerous to attempt long passes that spend their entire flight within the same third of the field.

Sandwich: A defensive technique in which two or more defenders in a matchup defense scheme cover two or more distinct spaces on the field (usually deep and under). By communicating and switching, the players can “sandwich” the cutters, effectively playing a miniature zone to prevent the offensive players from getting open.

Synonymous terms: “Bracket”

2. When two defenders surround a single offensive player underneath a floating huck as all three attempt to make a play on the disc.

Savage: Playing without any subs. Because of its negative connotations related to Indigenous populations, it is strongly discouraged in the Ultiworld Style Guide.

Scoober: An upside-down throw where the disc is held in a forehand grip and released with the bottom of the disc facing up. Similar to a hammer, but released flatter rather than more vertically.

Seven cut: When an offensive player cuts upline from behind the disc, then plants and cuts horizontally back across towards the middle of the field, making the shape of a 7.

Shooter: A thrower that is primarily or frequently looking to throw hucks, often used to alert defenders that they must protect the deep space.

Short Deep: The player that covers the middle of the field in a zone defense, behind the cup or front wall but in front of the deep in line with the wings.

Synonymous terms: “Middle,” “Middle Middle”

Side stack: An offensive formation where cutters line up vertically along a sideline in the downfield space.

Sidearm: A fundamental throw in ultimate that is released with the palm of the hand facing the target or towards the sky. Similar to a tennis forehand or a sidearm pitch in baseball.

Synonymous terms: “Flick,” “Forehand”

Sky: Catching or defending the disc high in the air, often over an opposing player.

Soft Cap: The beginning of the end of a game after a predetermined amount of time has elapsed. While ultimate is often played primarily to a point total, there are typically time limitations on the length of a game. At the soft cap, play continues until the current scoring attempt is completed. If, after the current scoring attempt is completed, the game total has not yet been reached by one team, one is added to the higher score and the resulting number is the new game total.

Spirit of the Game: A set of governing principles that places the responsibility for fair play on the players. As laid out in the official USAU and WFDF rules, highly competitive play is encouraged, but never at the expense of mutual respect among competitors, adherence to the agreed upon rules, or the basic joy of play. Seen as a foundational element of the self-officiated version of the game, it stipulates that all players are responsible for knowing, administering, and adhering to the rules.

Spirit timeout: A pause in play called by one or both teams if they believe that either or both teams have failed to follow the Spirit of the Game.

Split stack: An offensive formation where some portion of cutters line up vertically along one sideline while the rest of the cutters line up vertically along the opposite sideline in the downfield space; this structure combining elements of vertical and horizontal stack.

Stack: An offensive formation where the cutters align themselves in a straight line shape in the downfield space.

Stall: A turnover caused by the thrower failing to release the disc within their allotted period of possession.

Synonymous terms: “Stall out”

Stall count: The period of time within which a thrower must release a throw, measured in a set number of seconds.

Strike: 1. An upline cut, usually by a handler.

Synonymous terms: “Upline”

2. A verbal defensive call to a marker to communicate that they should try to stop a throw to such a cut.

Strip: When a foul causes a player to lose possession of a disc that they previously possessed.

Swill: A poor throw with a low chance of completion, most often a high floating throw in windy conditions.

Swing: 1. Moving the disc horizontally from one side of the field to another.

2. A throw that accomplishes this action.

3. An offensive player positioned to receive such a pass.

Switch: A defensive tactic where defenders exchange responsibility for a given offensive player or multiple offensive players.

T

Taco: To cause a disc to lose its flat shape and bend along a single fold down the middle, most often by throwing or spiking a disc hard into the ground on its edge, or in the process of a catch that sees it buckle on ground contact.

Thumber: An overhead throw similar to a hammer but with a grip that places the thumb along the inside of the disc’s rim; it is released close to vertical with the bottom of the disc facing the thrower, turns over as it travels, and reaches its target upside down.

Toe the line: To make a catch where the disc is in the process of going out of bounds and establishing a point of contact inbounds with your foot.

Transition: 1. The switch from offense to defense (or vice versa) after a turnover changes possession between teams.

2. A switch between tactical sets, either on offense or defense.

Trap: A defensive tactic attempting to pin an offensive player in possession of the disc near a sideline, limiting throwing options.

Travel: When a player in possession of the disc fails to appropriately set and maintain a single point of contact with the ground as they pivot.

Turf: Inadvertently throw the disc into the ground, causing a turnover.

Turn: A loss of possession by the offense caused by an incomplete pass, an interception, or a stall out.

Synonymous terms: “Turnover”

Turnover: A loss of possession by the offense caused by an incomplete pass, an interception, or a stall out.

Synonymous terms: “Turn”

U

Under: 1. The downfield space closer to the disc relative to the attacking end zone.

2. A downfield cut towards the disc into that space.

Universe point: The term for the final point of a tied game in which the next point determines the winner.

Synonymous terms: “Double game point,” “DGP”

Up: Verbal call to signal to downfield players that a disc has been thrown and is in the air.

Upfield: The area of the field in front of the thrower relative to the direction of offensive movement, though occasionally also used to refer to the area behind the thrower. Because of these contradictory uses, it is discouraged in the Ultiworld Style Guide.

Synonymous terms: “Downfield”

Upline: A cut from a lateral position on the break side beside or behind the thrower into the downfield open side.

Synonymous terms: “Strike”

Upwind: Wind blowing from endzone to endzone against the direction of offensive moment.

V

Vertical stack: An offensive formation where cutters line up vertically in the middle of the downfield space.

Violation: Any rule infraction that does not involve physical contact between players.

W

Weave: An offensive tactic where a subset of players — most commonly three — pass the disc quickly amongst themselves to move the dic up the field, while the rest of the offesnive players stay out of the way.

Win the Fields: A term popularized by Lou Burruss that means being the last team at the tournament fields at the end of a day of competition.

Wing: A player that covers the space near a sideline as a part of a zone defense.

X

X step: A footwork approach typically used for pulling or disc golf driving where the trailing foot (left foot for a right-handed thrower) crosses behind the lead/plant foot on the approach to the pull, allowing the thrower a larger rotational range of motion and improving power generation.

Synonymous terms: “Cross step”

Y
Z

Zipper: An offensive play from a vertical stack where two players at one end of the stack cut horizontally in opposite directions, allowing the third from the front or back to cut vertically straight toward or away from the thrower.

Zone: A defensive scheme that assigns defenders to cover certain areas of the field instead of individual offensive players.

Photo: Paul Rutherford — UltiPhotos.com
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